As a child growing up in the 80s, other than trying to break my Rubik’s Cube, I can remember the t-shirts all the cooler older kids were wearing. We didn’t see too many black people in my hometown in the west of Scotland. There were a handful of Chinese families and a few more Pakistani families, but no black people. Ayrshire wasn’t exactly a centre of multiculturalism. It still isn’t. Back then I knew only a handful of black people – mainly from television. There was Trevor McDonald telling the news, Sergeant Bosco Albert “B. A.” (Bad Attitude) Baracus from the A-Team, and a man on the t-shirts called “Free Nelson Mandela.” In time, while enjoying my own freedom, I grew up and Mr. Mandela got his freedom. On May 10 1994 Moira Stewart, a black woman, told us on the BBC that after 27 years Nelson Mandela was a free man. More than half a million people gathered in Cape Town, South Africa, to welcome him home. This is one thing to remember the tenth of May for, but today it wasn’t the first thing on my mind.


On the cobbles of Trinity College, Dublin, something truly wonderful happened on the tenth of May back in 2007. Yes, I could tell you all about it, but I’m not going too. It is wonderful sharing things on a blog, and sometimes we can share too much. So I’m not going to share this one with you. This memory belongs to me and just one other person. All that I will say is that it was the end of a terrible amount of bungled attempts, and nervousness, and that it led to places I could have never imagined possible. Tonight, at least, it was the reason behind escaping church and going for a wonderful meal. I do hope that this entry wasn’t too much of a disappointment for you (dear reader), but look on the bright side – you were reminded of one of the greatest moments in modern history, and the Rubik’s Cube. Have a wonderful Sunday night.

– Ùr-Fhàsaidh
Jason Michael
Blog Author

Advertisements

Please Share Your Thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s